// Rajabasa


Facts

Elevation: 1,281 m (4,203 ft) Prominence: 1,259 m
Ribu category: Google MarkerKurang Tinggi Province: Lampung
Google Earth: kml Other names:
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Photos

RajabasaNext »
On the slopes of Rajabasa, looking down at the coast near Kalianda (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)On the slopes of Rajabasa, looking down at the coast near Kalianda (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
On the slopes of Rajabasa, looking down at the coast near Kalianda (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
The now dormant and somewhat swampy Rajabasa crater (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)The now dormant and somewhat swampy Rajabasa crater (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
The now dormant and somewhat swampy Rajabasa crater (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
Close to Rajabasa summit (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)Close to Rajabasa summit (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
Close to Rajabasa summit (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
Rajabasa summit signs (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)Rajabasa summit signs (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)
Rajabasa summit signs (Daniel Quinn, October 2009)

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Bagging It!

Rajabasa is the southernmost Ribu on the island of Sumatra and, as such, is accessible from Jakarta in a weekend. If you do not have your own transport, the best thing to do is take a DAMRI bus from Gambir railway station to Bandar Lampung. This includes the ferry crossing over the Sunda Strait. After the crossing, ask to be let off the bus near Kalianda near the southern tip of Sumatra.

The mountain is very much an isolated one, and from the Trans-Sumatra highway it looks a great deal higher than it really is. However, since you have to start from near sea level, it is no less a hike than, say, Salak or Karang. It takes 6 or 7 hours up and down and the starting point is Sumur Kumbang near Way Belerang (the natural hot water bathing pool) a couple of kilometres south of the town of Kalianda. As is the case with many peaks of this size, there are many, many farm tracks on its lower slopes, so it is definitely advisable to find a local guide, or at least be prepared to ask for help from the many farmers who work on the slopes of the mountain. As long as you’re heading ‘up’, you’ll generally be ok, especially if you follow one of several small water pipes running up/down the hillside.

The mountain is mostly covered in vegetation, but there are places where you can admire the view of Lampung’s southwest coast and as you near the summit you find that you are walking along the edge of a very old and dormant crater. Apparently there was increased volcanic activity here during the latter part of the nineteenth century (perhaps something to do with nearby Krakatau?) but it is not known when Rajabasa last erupted.

The summit itself (1,281.2m) is a small, pleasant, grassy area with a number of signs and flags left by other hikers and, despite not being able to admire the view to the Krakatau islands due to excess vegetation), a few other Lampung peaks further north and west are visible in good conditions. The other, more forested peak (1,278m) to the east of the crater is just three metres below the true summit, according to Bakosurtanal, but the views are likely to be very limited indeed due to all the vegetation on top.

It is best to return the same way and perhaps treat yourself to a quick splash in the natural hot water bathing pool. Kalianda has some wonderful beaches to explore and transport back to Jakarta is rarely difficult to find.

Bagging information by Daniel Quinn

Practicalities

Getting there DAMRI buses to Bandar Lampung depart morning and evening from Jakarta’s Gambir railway station. Get off just before Kalianda.
Accommodation The best place to stay is in nearby Kalianda. There is also an upmarket resort several kilometres north of the town.
Permits None required but take a photocopy of your passport photo page just incase.
Water sources Unreliable – take sufficient supplies with you.
Find a local guide:
Local Average Monthly Rainfall (mm): bandarlampung

Location

Origins and Meaning

‘Raja basah’ means ‘wet king’ in Indonesian! One Lampung resident explains that ‘raja’ also means ‘regal’ or ‘royal’. The ‘basah’ part may be due to the mountain receiving a considerable amount rain and cloud.

Links and References

Wikipedia English

Wikipedia Indonesia

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Trip Reports and Comments

2 entries for “Rajabasa”

  1. avatar

    Hi,

    I’ve just climbed Gunung Rajabasa today and despite not offering great views from the summit, I think it is a great hike.

    The upper half of the mountain is full of wildlife such birds, wild pigs and many siamangs which you can see quite close as they jump along the trees.

    John, thanks a lot for your tips, they’ve been really helpful for me to find the right path, as I did the climb on my own and couldn’t get any track for the GPS.

    I have logged the track and I have shared it through http://www.wikiloc.com. if anyone interested, it can be downloaded from that website.

    Posted by Pedro Blasco | February 11, 2014, 21:42
  2. avatar

    If you turn left off the road that heads from Kalianda up to Way Belerang and head east for a kilometer you’ll reach the village of Sumur Kumbang (alt.174m), which is a better starting point than the hot springs itself.

    I met up there with Dedi (HP: 085664655882), a local nature lover, and some Kalianda students who were planning a tour of the summit and crater.

    If you the road straight up through Sumur Kumbang, branch right at the upper junction and then take a path on the right 50m further up beside a house, you’ll find a concrete path through a cocoa plantation. If you find a few people to ask, you should make it through the plantation without getting lost and after an hour or so you’ll reach a stream at 550m.

    From there on there’s only one path, which climbs steeply but pleasantly through forest up to the west rim of the crater. We took just under 4 hours from Sumur Kumbang to the summit.

    From the clearing 20 metres below the summit it’s possible to reach the crater. Double back to the near left corner of the clearing (far right corner if you’re coming back down from the summit) where there’s a narrow path down to a col. Turn left from here down into the overgrown crater, which is about 150m deep. In rain this path would be very slippery and in any case the crater is said to become a marsh/ lake in the rainy season.

    In dry conditions, you can walk around the edge of the crater, climb up a path on the northeast flank and then continue around the rim to rejoin the main path at the northwest corner.

    Rather than do this and descend by the same route, we headed down northeast from the lip of the crater along a hunter’s trail that leads down to a coffee plantation. This route offers a glimpse and a sniff of the sulphur-seeping gash on the mountain’s north slope. However, the trail down the ridge here is hard to follow, even in the plantation section!

    Don’t settle for a quick splash in the hot pools at Way Belerang. Treat yourself to a long soak- with a Bintang from the Alfamart and some sulphurous soap you can buy on site! It’ll clear up your acne! (the sulphur that is, not the Bintang…)

    Posted by John Hargreaves | November 4, 2012, 19:17

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